FAQ 2017-11-02T19:30:53+00:00

Frequently Asked Questions

What if I am uncomfortable with the idea of counseling/psychotherapy? 2017-07-18T18:18:40+00:00

It is better to face our problems then run and hide from them. People often try to distract from their issues with alcohol, drugs, avoidance, overextending, distractions, and other maladaptive coping strategies. Sometimes initially people feel a little worse before they get better. It’s kind of like exercise. You’re going to be a little sore when you first start. But it is well worth it! This is sometimes because some people have defended against negative feelings by denying, compartmentalizing, distracting, and avoiding looking at themselves clearly. It can be a little tense when the issues are first put on the table. However, these issues have a way of coming out in bad ways and controlling us, instead of us controlling the issues.

How long are appointments and how many will I need? 2017-07-18T18:18:21+00:00

Appointments are approximately 50 minutes long. Most clients benefit from sessions once a week initially. Then, based on progress we can go to every other week and so on. Since each client is unique and has different goals, this varies. If the problems are relatively simple and clear, it may only take five sessions. If the issues are more complex and deep, it may take ten to fifteen sessions or more. Most of my client’s feel a sense of relief and insight within 12 sessions.

Will my insurance cover counseling/psychotherapy? 2017-07-18T18:18:03+00:00

Probably. Most of the time insurance will cover counseling. Please contact your health plan and ask them what your benefits are for outpatient counseling in an office setting. The phone number is usually on the back of your insurance card. Just ask your representative what your co-pay is and if you have a deductible. Write this information down and bring it along with your insurance card to your first appointment. Your benefits will be verified after your first visit.

What makes a good therapist? 2017-07-21T17:59:47+00:00

Honesty, Sincerity, Genuiness and Frankness: A good therapist is someone who will be honest with you, but not so honest that it is harmful to you. The key is honesty and frankness with tact. Therapy isn’t about bringing you down, it is about helping you examine yourself in an open and honest way that is supportive so that you can learn and grow. If your therapist is overprotective of you, your therapist isn’t trusting your personal ability to heal. In reality, healing is up to you, not your therapist. Your therapist needs to trust your ability to heal yourself and not protect you from the truth, but on the other hand, it isn’t helpful if you walk away from therapy feeling attacked or abused. Truth is only good if it is used to strengthen you. It is not helpful if it is used against you. Often the truth can be very painful, but a good therapist will be honest with you without being harmful towards you. Truth used as a weapon isn’t healing truth, it is abuse.

If It Ain’t Broke, Don’t Fix It. If something is working in your life, it isn’t in need of repair. A good therapist is going to focus on your strengths and help you learn to use your strengths when facing areas of weakness. Your strengths don’t need fixing, they are already working. A good rule of thumb is, if it is working do more of it. If it isn’t working, try something else, but if it is already working, there is no reason to change what is working for you.

Trustworthy: This is something that is critical. Therapy is a very personal and private relationship. It is important that you can trust your therapist, and more importantly, that your therapist is someone who is worthy of the trust you give. A trustworthy therapist is someone who listens to you, is dependable, has good professional boundaries, and doesn’t throw surprises your way, but is predictable. If you know that when you go to therapy at 3:00pm, your therapist is going to be there at 3:00pm, see you for the full session time, is going to treat you with respect, set limits if necessary, and can be counted on, then you are working with a trustworthy therapist.

Do you take insurance? 2017-08-24T18:44:51+00:00

Yes. Accepted are most major health insurance plans, and managed care plans. Including Aetna, Blue Cross/Blue shield, CMC/Carolina Behavioral Health Alliance (CBHA), Cigna, Magellan, Medcost, United Healthcare/Optum Health, Value Options, and NC State Health Plan. Also, most major Employee Assistance Programs (EAP’s) are accepted. Including Corporate Counseling Associates (CCA), Network Advantage, Cigna EAP, Aetna EAP, United health Care/United Behavioral Health (UBH) EAP/Optum Health EAP, and more.

How do I schedule and appointment? 2017-07-18T17:58:27+00:00

Just call Greg at 704-787-1793, or email him at gpreston003@gmail.com. You can email him with your phone number and the best time to reach you. If he can’t answer his phone when you call, just leave a message with your name and phone number, and he’ll call you back as soon as possible. It’s confidential, he is the only one that hears the message, so you can leave personal information, if you would like.

What are your fees? 2017-09-05T18:50:02+00:00

Preston Counseling charges $120 for the initial evaluation session. Once you have completed the initial assessment, the fee is $100 for individual counseling  and $120 for sessions with more than one person in the room with the counselor.

Are the fees negotiable or on a sliding scale? 2017-09-05T18:50:26+00:00

Yes, please contact Greg to discuss at gpreston003@gmail.com or call 707-787-1793.